Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Madigan and Daley (Richard J. that is)

The late Mayor Richard J. Daley and House Speaker Michael J. Madigan are arguably the state’s two most powerful Democratic political figures of the past century, but until last week, I’d never stopped to consider the influence of the one on the other.


Then the University of Illinois at Chicago made public a transcript of an interview with Madigan as part of the elder Daley’s historical archives, and everything came into sharper focus.
In the revealing 2009 chat with UIC historian and professor emeritus Robert Remini, Madigan spoke reverently of the former mayor as a mentor who taught him the ropes of political leadership and the exercise of power.

In the process, the always guarded speaker offered some rare insights into his own thought processes.
Madigan said he keeps the mass card from the funeral of Daley’s

Sunday, July 26, 2015

More about the chronic problem. Hundreds bid farewell to Sandra Bland

Hundreds bid farewell to Sandra Bland as her family and the media tries to turn a suicide into a police brutality incident FOX 32 News Chicago

It's a chronic problem

Chief Keef, is bad news. 
“I’d spit hundreds on his broke a–……” according to a comment posted on the video under Keef’s name. Keef’s concert was a part of an effort to raise money for two victims of violence in Chicago.

In an emailed statement from wealthy businessman Alki David, the backer of the Chief Keef benefit concert, David wrote: “Shame on the mayor and police chief of Hammond for shutting down a voice that can create positive change in a community in desperate need. And for taking away money that could have gone to help the victims’ families.  This was a legal event and there was no justification to shut it down besides your glaring disregard for the First Amendment right to free speech. You’ve clearly been bullied by the proud mayor of the Murder Capitol of the U.S., Rahm Emanuel. Mark my words if you censor us you only make us stronger. Plus we’ll be back to sue your a—-.”

Earlier Saturday, Devon Bonaparte,  a promoter with Capital Connect that was behind Craze Fest, told the Sun-Times that Keef was not appearing in any fashion at the Hammond event.

The event was supposed to have a special surprise guest, but Bonaparte said categorically it was not going to be Keef.
Bonaparte said after the concert: “I told everybody that [Chief Keef wasn't performing] because at first we weren’t going to do it. After we talked to the cops, we thought maybe we wouldn’t do it. But at the end of the night, we just thought, hey, let go for it…”

Confusion had reigned earlier Saturday on where Keef would appear for the fundraising concert.

Just before 6 p.m. Saturday, the rapper’s Twitter account announced the concert would be at Lincoln Hall, but that North Side venue shot that down in its own Twitter post, saying the hologram concert wasn’t happening there.

Monday, July 20, 2015

Dart vs Dart, after 64 months of some intense litigation, there is a judgement. In my view this case is sad. Draw your own conclusions.

Sheriff of Cook County during happier times

PROBATE DIVISION COURT DOCKET INQUIRY 
Case Number: 2010P000587Calendar: 02Date Filed: 2/1/2010
Division: PROBATE
Estate Of DART WILLIAM F
Case Type: PET. FOR PROBATE OF DECEDENT'S EST. - WILL, INDEP. ADMIN. 
Representative
DART KATHLEEN M 

Activity Date:
2/1/2010
The Estate of  
DART WILLIAM F

PET. FOR PROBATE OF DECEDENT'S EST. - WILL, INDEP. ADMIN.
Court_Fee: 
$ 31400
Attorney: 
MAHONEY CROWE GOLDRICK PC
77W WASHNGTON 1515
CHICAGO IL,60602
312-7824554
Judgment Amount: 
$ 0
Judge: 
Representative, Minor or Claimant:
Microfilm: 
000000000
Court Date: 
Court Room: 
Court Time: 
00:00
Insurance Code: 
Shared Case Number: 


Activity Date:
2/1/2010
The Estate of  
DART WILLIAM F

HEARING DATE SET (DATE, TIME)
Court_Fee: 
$ 0
Attorney: 
Pro Se
Judgment Amount: 
$ 0
Judge: 

Sunday, July 19, 2015

Medal of Honor winner has issued a call to action!


No more discussion, no more open borders, no more immigration from muslim countries. 



Dakota Meyer
Dakota Meyer was presented with a medal of honour in 2011 for his courage while serving in Afghanistan

The shooting deaths of four US Marines in Chattanooga has once again thrust the gun debate into the spotlight. When former Medal of Honor winner Dakota Meyer posted a pro-gun message on Facebook, it generated a huge reaction online - illustrating how many here see the issue.
Dakota Meyer's Facebook post, which went online hours after the four US Marines were shot and killed, called for Americans to exercise their Constitutional right to bear arms.
"Now is not the time to come out waving photos of bullet holes in the glass calling for more gun control and spinning the story to yield a further separation of peoples in the United States.
"Now is the time for a call on the American people to finally realise the state of the world we are living in and the enemy that we face," he wrote.
The FBI has not made any conclusions about the motive of the alleged gunman, Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez. They do say there is nothing to link him to IS.



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Four marines were killed in Thursday's attack

But Meyer, a former Marine who won a medal for his bravery in Afghanistan, equated the attack with the threat posed by the Islamist group.
"I, for one, do not plan to give away by ability to defend myself and those I care about. I carry a firearm with me at all times legally under the conceal and carry laws in the area that I am in," he said.
With more than half a million people sharing post and nearly as many people liking it, Meyer's words have struck a chord with a large number of Americans. He already has a large social media following in the US, with more than 60,000 followers on Twitter.



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For decades gun control campaigners have called for restrictions on ownership in the US

"Dakota Meyer, you are correct and it is our right to be able to defend ourselves!," wrote Melinda Palmer Matney, whose sentiments were echoed in a large majority of the more than 67,000 comments.
Rosa Narvaez Every agreed: "Never ever stop looking over your shoulder cause those terrorist might be walking right behind you. No, they are indeed here already, and they have more than one gun."



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Many in the US argue increased gun ownership is the way to deal with terror threats

As more people visited the page, many gun control advocates began to share their concerns. "Another gun nut. A tragedy perpetrated by a domestic terrorist occurs, and all he's worried about it protecting his firearms. I am so tired of hearing about 2nd Amendment right," wrote Thomas Gesswein.
"I have never understood the whole debate about the gun laws and making it harder for someone to get one," was Candice Gorrell's view. "Do people not see that the only ones this will affect are LAW ABIDING CITIZENS? While we are sitting ducks due to our right to protect ourselves being taken away, CRIMINALS and TERRORISTS will continue to have guns, purchase guns, and use guns."
The gun control debate in the US is ubiquitous, but tragedies like Chattanooga push it back into centre stage. Meyer's comments, which came a month after the Charleston shootings, and the same day James Holmes was convicted of the Aurora cinema attack, show just how polarised the conversation is, and how the fear of IS on US soil has brought a new dimension to the discussion.