Showing posts with label Science. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Science. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

New species of giant rat discovered in suburban Chicago

New species of giant rat discovered is so big it can crack coconuts with its teeth
The possum-like rat, Uromys vika, was believed to be mythical until it was discovered in Winfield, Illinois last month after seven years of searching Pacific islands.


BY MARK WAGHORN

An illustration shows the new species of giant rat, the Uromys vika (Image: The Field Museum / SWNS.com)


A new species of giant rat has been discovered in suburban Chicago which is so strong it can crack open coconuts with its teeth.

Measuring one-and-a-half feet long and weighing more than a kilo (2lbs), it is five times bigger than

Monday, August 21, 2017

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Global Warming, no doubt

More flooding expected with 'torrential' rains possible Saturday

Sunday, May 21, 2017

All this in the name of science at the Ag school

A See-Through Cow? New Arrival Gives Ag School Kids Inside Look At Biology

By Howard Ludwig | May 19, 2017 10:57am | Updated on May 19, 2017 12:27pm
 A cannulated dairy cow arrived Thursday evening at the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences in Mount Greenwood. The three-year-old cow is fitted with a port in her side that allows students to examine the animal's stomach contents.
Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences
MOUNT GREENWOOD — Hole-y Cow.
A cannulated dairy cow arrived Thursday evening at the Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences in Mount Greenwood. The three-year-old cow is surgically fitted with a cannula — a port used to study its stomach contents.
The unnamed cow was quickly getting comfortable with her new surroundings Friday

Monday, February 20, 2017

Global warming being felt here

Ice-locked ship to drift over North Pole as Chicago gets ready to bake this summer

Media captionMarkus Rex: "A new and fascinating insight into the climate system"
It is being billed as the biggest single Arctic research expedition ever planned. 
Germany is going to sail its 120m-long research vessel, the Polarstern, into the sea-ice at the top of the world and just let it get stuck so it can drift across the north pole. 
The 2,500km (1,550-mile) trip, to begin in 2019, is likely to take a year. 
Researchers hope to gather valuable new insights on the region where Earth's climate is changing fastest causing a even faster change in the midwest. 
Last month the extent of Arctic sea-ice was the lowest ever recorded for a January (during

Sunday, January 17, 2016


Scientist at Chicago State University are studying 19th Ward residents to gauge how soon humans will develop webbed feet.
The thinking is that webbed feet people will soon be spotted at the bottom of the hill along Longwood Drive. This will all be due to the increased flooding that is going to be caused by global warming. (The flooding has nothing to do with the restrictors that were installed in the sewers, nothing at all.)

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Spy Flights

Does the benefit to society outweigh the damage done by a invasion of privacy? What happens to the data they collect?
WASHINGTON—The Justice Department is scooping up data from thousands of mobile phones through devices deployed on airplanes that mimic cellphone towers, a high-tech hunt for criminal suspects that is snagging a large number of innocent Americans, according to people familiar with the operations.
The U.S. Marshals Service program, which became fully functional around 2007, operates Cessna aircraft from at least five metropolitan-area airports, with a flying range covering most of the U.S. population, according to people familiar with the program.
The Wall Street Journal has learned of a new federal law enforcement program that uses planes and cell signals to track criminal suspects.
Planes are equipped with devices—some known as “dirtboxes” to law-enforcement officials because of the initials of the BoeingCo. unit that produces them—which mimic cell towers of large telecommunications firms and trick cellphones into reporting their unique registration information.
The technology in the two-foot-square device enables investigators to scoop data from tens of thousands of cellphones in a single flight, collecting their identifying information and general location, these people said.
People with knowledge of the program wouldn’t discuss the frequency or duration of such flights, but said they take place on a regular basis.
A Justice Department official would neither confirm nor deny the existence of such a program. The official said discussion of such matters would allow criminal suspects or foreign powers to determine U.S. surveillance capabilities. Justice Department agencies comply with federal law, including by seeking court approval, the official said.
The program is the latest example of the extent to which the U.S. is training its surveillance lens inside the U.S. It is similar in approach to the National Security Agency’s program to collect millions of Americans phone records, in that it scoops up large volumes of data in order to find a single person or a handful of people. The U.S. government justified the phone-records collection by arguing it is a minimally invasive way of searching for terrorists.
Christopher Soghoian, chief technologist at the American Civil Liberties Union, called it “a dragnet surveillance program. It’s inexcusable and it’s likely—to the extent judges are authorizing it—[that] they have no idea of the scale of it.”
Cellphones are programmed to connect automatically to the strongest cell tower signal. The device being used by the U.S. Marshals Service identifies itself as having the closest, strongest signal, even though it doesn’t, and forces all the phones that can detect its signal to send in their unique registration information.
Even having encryption on a phone, such as the kind included on Apple Inc. ’s iPhone 6, doesn’t prevent this process.
The technology is aimed at locating cellphones linked to individuals under investigation by the government, including fugitives and drug dealers, but it collects information on cellphones belonging to people who aren’t criminal suspects, these people said. They said the device determines which phones belong to suspects and “lets go” of the non-suspect phones.
The device can briefly interrupt calls on certain phones. Authorities have tried to minimize the potential for harm, including modifying the software to ensure the fake tower doesn’t interrupt anyone calling 911 for emergency help, one person familiar with the matter said.
The program cuts out phone companies as an intermediary in searching for suspects. Rather than asking a company for cell-tower information to help locate a suspect, which law enforcement has criticized as slow and inaccurate, the government can now get that information itself. People familiar with the program say they do get court orders to search for phones, but it isn’t clear if those orders describe the methods used because the orders are sealed.
Also unknown are the steps taken to ensure data collected on innocent people isn’t kept for future examination by investigators. A federal appeals court ruled earlier this year that over-collection of data by investigators, and stockpiling of such data, was a violation of the Constitution.
The program is more sophisticated than anything previously understood about government use of such technology. Until now, the hunting of digital trails created by cellphones had been thought limited to devices carried in cars that scan the immediate area for signals. Civil-liberties groups are suing for information about use of such lower-grade devices, some of them called Stingrays, by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
By taking the program airborne, the government can sift through a greater volume of information and with greater precision, these people said. If a suspect’s cellphone is identified, the technology can pinpoint its location within about 10 feet, down to a specific room in a building. Newer versions of the technology can be programmed to do more than suck in data: They can also jam signals and retrieve data from a target phone such as texts or photos. It isn’t clear if this domestic program has ever used those features.
Similar devices are used by U.S. military and intelligence officials operating in other countries, including in war zones, where they are sometimes used to locate terrorist suspects, according to people familiar with the work. In the U.S., these people said, the technology has been effective in catching suspected drug dealers and killers. They wouldn’t say which suspects were caught through this method.
The scanning is done by the Technical Operations Group of the U.S. Marshals Service, which tracks fugitives, among other things. Sometimes it deploys the technology on targets requested by other parts of the Justice Department.
Within the Marshals Service, some have questioned the legality of such operations and the internal safeguards, these people said. They say scooping up of large volumes of information, even for a short period, may not be properly understood by judges who approve requests for the government to locate a suspect’s phone.
Some within the agency also question whether people scanning cellphone signals are doing enough to minimize intrusions into the phones of other citizens, and if there are effective procedures in place to safeguard the handling of that data.
It is unclear how closely the Justice Department oversees the program. “What is done on U.S. soil is completely legal,” said one person familiar with the program. “Whether it should be done is a separate question.”
Referring to the more limited range of Stingray devices, Mr. Soghoian of the ACLU said: “Maybe it’s worth violating privacy of hundreds of people to catch a suspect, but is it worth thousands or tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of peoples’ privacy?”
The existence of the cellphone program could escalate tensions between Washington and technology companies, including the telecom firms whose devices are being redirected by the program.
If a suspect is believed to have a cellphone from Verizon Communications Inc., for example, the device would emit a signal fooling Verizon phones and those roaming on Verizon’s network into thinking the plane is the nearest available Verizon cell tower. Phones that are turned on, even if not in use, would “ping’’ the flying device and send their registration information. In a densely populated area, the dirtbox could pick up data of tens of thousands of cellphones.
The approach is similar to what computer hackers refer to as a “man in the middle’’ attack, in which a person’s electronic device is tricked into thinking it is relaying data to a legitimate or intended part of the communications system.
A Verizon spokesman said the company was unaware of the program. “The security of Verizon’s network and our customers’ privacy are top priorities,’’ the spokesman said. “However, to be clear, the equipment referenced in the article is not Verizon’s and is not part of our network.”
An AT&T Inc. spokeswoman declined to comment, as did a spokeswoman for Sprint Corp.
For cost reasons, the flights usually target a number of suspects at a time, rather than just a single fugitive. But they can be used for a single suspect if the need is great enough to merit the resources, these people said.
The dirtbox and Stingray are both types of what tech experts call “IMSI catchers,’’ named for the identification system used by networks to identify individual cellphones.
The name “dirtbox’’ came from the acronym of the company making the device, DRT, for Digital Receiver Technology Inc., people said. DRT is now a subsidiary of Boeing. A Boeing spokeswoman declined to comment.
“DRT has developed a device that emulates a cellular base station to attract cellphones for a registration process even when they are not in use,’’ according to a 2010 regulatory filing Boeing made with the U.S. Commerce Department, which touted the device’s success in finding contraband cellphones smuggled in to prison inmates.
Corrections & Amplifications
An earlier version of this article incorrectly named Digital Receiver Technology Inc. as Digital Recovery Technology Inc. It also incorrectly listed what is known as IMSI catcher technology as ISMI catcher.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

EBOLA, it's here.


(CNN) -- For the first time, a patient in an American hospital has been diagnosed with Ebola.
The unidentified man, who is being treated at a Dallas hospital, didn't show symptoms until after four or five days of arriving in the United States from Liberia.
Officials are being tight-lipped about how he contracted the virus or how he's being treated, citing privacy concerns.
But shortly after the news broke Tuesday evening, more than 50,000 tweets about Ebola flew through Twitter in a one-hour period, many of them panicked responses.
Should we be concerned?
The short answer: no.
Now let's get to the long answer.
Could the patient's fellow passengers be infected?
The patient being treated in Texas flew from one of the Ebola hot zones -- Liberia -- to Dallas.
But his fellow passengers aren't thought to be at risk because you can only contract Ebola through direct contact with the bodily fluids of someone who's actively sick with with it.
It's not like a cold or the flu, which can be spread before symptoms show up. And it doesn't spread through the air.
"It's very unlikely that (Ebola victims) would be able to spread the disease to fellow passengers," said Stephen Monroe of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
What's to stop other Ebola patients getting on a flight and coming here?
The CDC has issued warnings to avoid nonessential travel toLiberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the countries grappling most with the outbreak.
And it's also working with airport officials in those nations, and in Nigeria, so every person getting on a plane is screened for fever.
"And if they have a fever, they are pulled out of the line, assessed for Ebola and don't fly unless Ebola is ruled out," CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden said.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

EBOLA, nothing to worry about. The government told us so.


How in the world is it possible that more than 170 health workers have been infected by the Ebola virus? That is the one question about Ebola that nobody can seem to answer.  The World Health Organization is reporting this as a fact, but no explanation is given as to why this is happening.  We are just assured that Ebola “is not airborne” and that getting infected “requires close contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person”.  If this is true, then how have more than 170 health workers caught the disease?  These workers are dressed head to toe in suits that are specifically designed to prevent the spread of the virus.  So how is this happening?  I could understand a handful of “mistakes” by health workers, but this is unlike anything that we have ever seen in the history of infectious diseases.  These health workers take extraordinary precautions to keep from getting the virus.  If it is spreading so easily to them, what chance is the general population going to have?
Overall, more than 1,700 people have been officially infected and more than 900 people have officially died so far.  But an official from Samaritan’s Purse says that the real numbers are probably far, far higher
Ken Isaacs, the vice president of Program and Government Relations for Samaritan’s Purse, painted an even bleaker picture. According to the World Health Organization, West Africa has counted 1,711 diagnoses and 932 deaths, already, which could represent only a small fraction of the true number. “We believe that these numbers represent just 25 to 50 percent of what is happening,” said Isaacs.

In a six-hour meeting with the president of Liberia last week, Isaacs said workers from Samaritan’s Purse and SIM watched as the “somber” officials explained the gravity of the situation in their countries, where hundreds lie dead in the streets. “It has an atmosphere of apocalypse,” Isaacs said of the Liberia Ministry of Health’s status updates. “Bodies lying in the street…gangs threatening to burn down hospitals. I believe this disease has the potential to be a national security risk for many nations. Our response has been a failure.” Isaacs says that the epidemic is inciting panic worldwide that, in his opinion, may soon be warranted. “We have to fight it now here or we’re going to have to fight it somewhere else.”